How 'Parasite' Delivered One Of The Best Twists In Cinema

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北京时间2月10日上午,第92届奥斯卡在美国洛杉矶好莱坞杜比剧院举行颁奖典礼。奉俊昊执导的韩国电影《寄生虫》分别斩获最佳影片、最佳导演、最佳国际影片、最佳原创剧本四项大奖,是首部获得最佳影片的非英语电影。是韩国的第一尊奥斯卡奖,更堪称亚洲电影的最高荣誉。那么《寄生虫》究竟有怎样的魅力,能得到如此认可呢?

Bong Joon-ho's Parasite is a virtually perfect film on every level.

On the surface, its technical execution is so precise and immaculate, that it's hard to notice the film's greatest achievement hiding underneath: the screenplay.

For Bong, who has written every single film in his career, Parasite is essentially a culmination of everything he's learned over the years.

But in its more than two hours of runtime, there is a single moment that truly exemplifies his genius, a sequence that transforms Parasite into cinematic perfection.

Like all great stories, Parasite has a beginning, a middle, and an end, yet it never quite follows the usual three-act structure we're familiar with.

Instead, the film plays a lot like two separate movies that are joined into one.

The first film deals with the two families: the impoverished Kims, who plan to infiltrate the wealthy Parks by each posing as a tutor, a driver, and a housekeeper.

But it creates an odd moment in the story about 50 minutes in, after the Kims have removed all of the existing employees to essentially take over the house.

Suddenly, there's no conflict left to carry the film, and the story comes to a literal stop.

But it's the sequence that bridges the end of the first film to the unexpected second where Bong stages his attack.

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